Alliance Relations & Security Cooperation

Following are all current, recent, and past IFPA projects, publications, conferences, workshops, articles, and presentations regarding U.S. alliance relations and/or security cooperation.

research
publications
events
articles &
presentations
  • Research

    The U.S.-Japan-ROK Strategic Triangle and Maritime Security: Building Capacity in Northeast Asia and in the Broader Indo-Pacific Region

    This project will focus on the prospects for improving and expanding U.S.-Japan-Republic of Korea (ROK) trilateral cooperation by promoting and building upon greater opportunities for maritime collaboration between and among these three critical allies.

     
    Managing the Global Impact of America’s Rebalance to Asia

    The principal drivers behind America's rebalance toward Asia are Asia's growing economic and strategic importance, as well as increased military spending in the region led by China and Russia, trends that are likely to continue in the foreseeable future. The challenge for U.S. policy makers is to minimize any extra-regional disruptions the rebalance may cause and to maximize its global benefits. This project is an integrated, cross-regional study of the rebalance and its global impact.

     
    Rowing Together: Developing Parallel Paths to Stability, Denuclearization and a Peace Regime on the Korean Peninsula

    With generous support from the Carnegie Corporation of New York, IFPA has launched this new project that focuses primary attention on the U.S.-ROK-China triangle as the key dynamic in helping to shape a peaceful and denuclearized Korean Peninsula.

     
    New Strategic Dynamics in the Arctic Region: Implications for National Security and International Collaboration

    This project explores and assesses trends that together could transform the Arctic from a relative strategic backwater to a strategic crossroads of global importance.

     
    After Hatoyama: Preparing for Japanese Foreign Policy in Transition

    This project studies the challenges that the recently elected Japanese government faces as it tries to develop viable alternatives to the bilateralism on which its foreign policy has been predicated for over fifty years.

     
    Peacebuilding as a U.S.-Japan Alliance Mission

    Working together with partners from Osaka University’s School of International Public Policy (OSIPP) and others, IFPA has undertaken this project to examine U.S.-Japan peacebuilding collaboration and how it could strengthen the alliance in the long run.

     
    Rapid Strategic Assessment for the NATO Special Operations Headquarters

    In support of the NATO Special Operations Headquarters (NSHQ), IFPA is a major contributor to the Rapid Strategic Assessment project, which works with NSHQ in carrying out its core missions.

     
    The U.S.-Japan Alliance and the Future of Extended Deterrence

    In the new setting since North Korea’s nuclear test, this project, completed in 2009, undertakes a fresh assessment of thinking in Japan and the United States about extended deterrence in Northeast Asia.

     
    In Times of Crisis: Global and Local Civil-Military Disaster Relief Coordination in the United States and Japan

    With support from the Japan Foundation's Center for Global Partnership (CGP), IFPA led this collaborative effort, completed in 2009, by U.S. and Japanese specialists to conduct research and foster dialogue among civilian and military groups for the purposes of improving their civil-military communication in domestic and international crises.

     
    Identifying Trends in Japan-DPRK Relations and Implications for U.S. Policy

    This project, funded by the Smith-Richardson Foundation and completed in 2006, examined the determining factors behind Japan's evolving North Korea policy and how they will affect America's strategic and tactical approaches to the DPRK.

     
    North American Homeland Security and Defense: Enhancing U.S. Joint Planning and Cooperation with Canada and Mexico in the War against Terrorism

    This project, completed in early 2006, explored options to increase homeland defense/security cooperation between the United States and Canada and between the United States and Mexico.

     
    Stability and Confidence Building on the Korean Peninsula: Meshing Korean Reconciliation with U.S. Security Requirements

    This study, funded by the Smith Richardson Foundation and completed in 2004, made a unique contribution both to the broad policy debate on the U.S. response to Korean reconciliation and to the articulation of a restructured military posture better suited to the geopolitical conditions of a reconciled (if not reunified) Korea. The study concluded with a monograph, Alliance Diversification and the Future of the U.S.-Korean Security Relationship, by Charles M. Perry, Jacquelyn K. Davis, James L. Schoff, and Toshi Yoshihara.

     
    Security Dynamics in Southeastern Europe

    IFPA and the Kokkalis Foundation (Athens, Greece) collaborated on a project to examine the principal strategic-military challenges in this uncertain and evolving region and to assess their implications for the bilateral U.S.-Greek relationship and broader Alliance relations. Three volumes were produced: Greek-Turkish Relations in the Era of Globalization, 2001; New Approaches to Balkan Studies, 2003; and Defense Reform, Modernization & Military Cooperation in Southeastern Europe, 2004.

     
    Northeast Asia After Korean Unification: Preparing the Japan-U.S. Alliance

    This joint three-year study completed in 2003 by IFPA and the Japan Institute of International Affairs (JIIA) examined the long-term implications of Korean unification for the U.S.-Japan alliance. The study concluded with a monograph, The U.S.-Japan Alliance: Preparing for Korean Reconciliation & Beyond, by Charles M. Perry and Toshi Yoshihara.

     
    Enhancing Joint Crisis Management Capabilities: Issues and Policy Options for Japan-U.S. Cooperation

    In this joint two-year study completed in 2002, IFPA and the Osaka School of International Public Policy (OSIPP) examined issues and policy options on joint crisis management between Japan and the United States, exploring how Tokyo and Washington might better prepare for and respond to an array of crisis scenarios ranging from traditional security threats to emerging challenges.

    Overseas Presence and Power Projection

    This study assessed the post-Cold War security environment and the contribution of American military posture to global security. Two monographs were produced: Airpower Synergies in the New Strategic Era and CVX: A Smart Carrier for a New Era.

     
  • Publications

    Managing the Global Impact of America's Rebalance to Asia
    Charles M. Perry and Bobby Andersen
    November 2014, 218 pp

    Some three years after President Obama announced in a November 2011 speech to the Australian parliament that he had made a “deliberate and strategic decision” for the United States to “play a larger and long-term role in shaping [the Asia-Pacific] region” and to make the U.S. “presence and mission in the Asia-Pacific a top priority,” the Pacific “pivot,” as it was initially called, remains very much a work in progress. This monograph reviews the rationale for the pivot, provides an update on its progress, assesses European views on the pivot and Asian security, and explores security trends in other regions and their implications for the pivot.

     
    Rowing Together: Developing Parallel Paths to Stability, Denuclearization and a Peace Regime on the Korean Peninsula
    Weston Konishi
    December 2013, 128 pp

    Many consider U.S.-China-Republic of Korea trilateral cooperation to be a key dynamic in achieving a denuclearized North Korea and a more lasting peace structure on the Korean Peninsula. Yet dialogue among these three actors is relatively unheard of, and Beijing, Seoul, and Washington continue to diverge on many critical aspects of managing the ongoing nuclear crisis with North Korea. Rather than “rowing together” on many critical areas of peninsular security, the United States, China, and the ROK have often been “rowing apart.” With generous support from the Carnegie Corporation of New York, the Institute for Foreign Policy Analysis (IFPA) launched a major project in 2011 aimed at enhancing U.S.-China-ROK dialogue on this critical issue and encouraging all three sides to “row together.” Leading experts and officials from all three countries convened over the course of two workshop sessions in Beijing and Jeju Island to explore new avenues for trilateral cooperation on the Korean Peninsula. IFPA commissioned six conference papers, each representing the views of the participating countries, from select workshop participants. The conference papers are collected here, in this compendium report, providing policy makers and researchers with an invaluable collection of analysis as well as realistic recommendations for improving trilateral cooperation toward containing and reducing (if not eliminating) North Korea’s nuclear programs and strengthening the prospects for stability and security on and around the Korean Peninsula.

     
    U.S.-Japan Peacebuilding Cooperation: Recommendations toward a Whole-of-Alliance Approach
    Co-edited by Weston S. Konishi and Hoshino Toshiya
    October 2012, 172 pp

    U.S.-Japan Peacebuilding Cooperation: Roles and Recommendations toward a Whole-of-Alliance Approach is a compendium of workshop papers written by U.S., Japanese, and other experts and provides a comprehensive examination of how bilateral peacebuilding cooperation can be enhanced, both in the context of bilateral whole-of-alliance cooperation and as an effective mechanism for international peacebuilding operations. With case studies of peacebuilding operations in Sudan and Afghanistan, this report seeks to illuminate the obstacles and opportunities of U.S.-Japan peacebuilding cooperation in real-world scenarios. A list of policy recommendations at the end of the report provides further points of consideration for both policy makers and students of U.S.-Japan alliance relations and international peacebuilding alike.

     
    From Rhetoric to Reality: Foreign-Policy Making under the Democratic Party of Japan
    Weston S. Konishi
    April 2012, 112 pp

    This report examines the Democratic Party of Japan (DPJ)’s foreign-policy making since it took power in 2009. Prepared as part of a project supported by the Smith Richardson Foundation, the report looks at the key people, policies, and processes that have come to underlie the DPJ’s foreign-policy making as a ruling party, and it includes an attempt to define and categorize four main foreign policy strains within the party. Rather than focus on the current state of U.S.-Japan relations, this study examines Japan’s broader diplomatic and strategic activity beyond the bilateral relationship while considering how these actions might impact the U.S.-Japan relationship in the future.

     
    New Strategic Dynamics in the Arctic Region: Implications for National Security and International Collaboration
    Charles M. Perry and Bobby Andersen
    February 2012, 190 pp

    A comprehensive examination of the new strategic map now emerging in the Arctic as the polar ice cap continues to melt, opening a new ocean and giving way to new and ever larger waterways in the High North. This monograph is available as a free PDF download or as a bound copy for $24.99.

     
    Denuclearizing North Korea: Exploring Multilateral Approaches to Risk Reduction and Peace Regime Building
    Weston S. Konishi
    September 2011, 71 pp

    The final project report from a nongovernmental (Track 2) multinational working group led by IFPA to address security issues on the Korean peninsula.

     
    The U.S. Approach to Peacebuilding: From a Whole-of-Government to a Whole-of-Alliance Approach with Japan
    Weston S. Konishi and Charles T. McClean
    June 2011, 14 pp

    This paper was first presented at a one-day bilateral workshop on April 29, 2011, held in conjunction with the Osaka School of International Public Policy (OSIPP) in Washington, D.C. In the papers, authors aim to assess each government's “whole-of-government” or interagency coordination of peacebuilding policies and to identify priorities, assets, and expertise as applied to Afghanistan and Sudan. The goal of the project is to explore the strengths and weaknesses of both the United States and Japan’s respective initiatives with an eye toward how the two allies can best cooperate and work synergistically in a “whole of alliance” approach to peacebuilding operations in vulnerable or failing states.

     
    Peacebuilding as a U.S.-Japan Alliance Mission: Developing a Complementary “Whole-of-Alliance” Approach
    Weston S. Konishi
    May 2011, 8 pp

    Summary of an April 29, 2011, workshop held in conjunction with the Osaka School of International Public Policy (OSIPP), Washington, D.C.

     
    Risk Reduction & Confidence Building on the Korean Peninsula: Challenges, Opportunities & Implications for Regional Stability
    Workshop report by Charles M. Perry, Jacquelyn K. Davis, and Weston S. Konishi
    May 2011, 21 pp

    Report on a January 19, 2011, workshop that brought together approximately fifty prominent policymakers and experts from the United States, the People’s Republic of China, and the Republic of Korea for in-depth discussions focusing on the current security situation on and surrounding the Korean Peninsula and prospects for greater cooperation among the three nations represented at the workshop.

     
    A New NATO, Euro-Atlantic Security, and the Greek-American Partnership
    June 2009

    Report on a high-level conference convened April 28-29, 2009, by the Defense Analysis Institute of the Hellenic Ministry of National Defense, the Konstantinos G. Karamanlis Foundation, and the Institute for Foreign Policy Analysis (IFPA) with official NATO sponsorship. As NATO marks its sixtieth anniversary, it faces enduring questions about strategic focus, operational priorities, military requirements, and collaborative ties with partner nations and other international institutions. Some of these questions were addressed at the April 2009 NATO summit in Strasbourg-Kehl, but a broader and ongoing dialogue will be essential as the Alliance moves forward in the years ahead; this conference addressed and contributed to that process.

     
    In Times of Crisis: U.S.-Japan Civil-Military Disaster Relief Coordination
    James L. Schoff and Marina Travayiakis
    May 2009, 144 pp

    The many large-scale natural disasters and ambitious nation-building projects over the last several years call attention to the potential value of deploying national military assets in support of disaster relief and recovery efforts, as well as to the challenges that disaster relief agencies and nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) face when working closely with the military. Both U.S. and Japanese policy makers understand that leveraging military resources during a disaster is an opportunity to save lives and property, to help maintain stability and prosperity in affected nations, and to promote the allies' diplomatic interests, but it must be done carefully. Together with a handful of other key countries, the United States and Japan can help form a valuable crisis core group that cooperates in support of large-scale, UN-led disaster relief operations, but effective civil-military coordination is essential to making this work. The In Times of Crisis project was a multi-year joint effort of the Institute for Foreign Policy Analysis (IFPA) and the Osaka School of International Public Policy (OSIPP), involving practitioners and policy makers from both countries, the United Nations, and NGOs through interviews and bilateral workshops. This monograph explains the team's findings and ways to improve the allies' ability to effectively pool civilian and military resources and to respond together (bilaterally or as part of a broader coalition) in support of host nations and international relief agencies to speed recovery in times of crisis.

     
    Peace Regime Building for a Nuclear Weapon-free Korean Peninsula: What Next?
    James L. Schoff and Yaron Eisenberg
    May 2009

    North Korea's recent nuclear test is only the latest in a series of moves by Pyongyang that seem directed at "shaping a new diplomatic framework" for the Korean Peninsula, rejecting the Six-Party process and returning to its traditional insistence on bilateral talks with the United States to end the Korean War. These developments illustrate the strong linkages between North Korean denuclearization and peace regime building on the Korean Peninsula (i.e., trying to institute a political solution to the Korean War beyond just a military armistice). Working with partners in South Korea, the United States, and China, IFPA is in the middle of a three-year project exploring peace regime building on the Korean Peninsula in ways that support and facilitate the denuclearization objectives of the Six-Party Talks; this interim report describes the results of over a year's worth of interviews, research, and a U.S.-South Korea bilateral workshop, up to and including North Korea's May 2009 nuclear test.

     
    Realigning Priorities: The U.S.-Japan Alliance and the Future of Extended Deterrence
    James L. Schoff
    May 2009

    North Korea's missile/rocket launch over Japan and maritime skirmishes in the South China Sea between the United States and China place new burdens on the U.S.-Japan security relationship. For more than two generations the United States has provided a security guarantee to Japan that is backed by the U.S. nuclear capability. The future of this extended deterrence relationship is the focus of this report. It addresses evolving discussion about deterrence in Japan as well as the United States and examines the conditions under which Japan might consider new approaches to assuring its future security.

     
    NATO's Relevance and EUCOM's Priorities in Dealing with a Rising Russia
    Jacquelyn K. Davis and Charles M. Perry
    August 2008

    This report summarizes and elaborates upon discussions held at an IFPA workshop by the same name held on July 30, 2008, and organized in support of GEN Bantz Craddock, USA, then SACEUR and commander of USEUCOM. The report discusses emerging Allied concerns over a more assertive Russian security posture, and discusses potential opportunities for USEUCOM-led security cooperation in the greater Black Sea and Caucasus region as a way to enhance stability. Against the backdrop of the Russian-Georgian conflict (which erupted shortly after the workshop was held), the report also offers recommendations for appropriate U.S. and Allied responses.

    NATO's Strategic Relevance and U.S. European Command Planning
    Jacquelyn K. Davis and Charles M. Perry
    March 2008

    This report analyzes the perspectives of NATO and SHAPE officials on the proper scope, focus, and timing of future adjustments to the Alliance’s 1999 Strategic Concept to bring it into closer accord with current and emerging strategic trends and priorities. The report also evaluates potential revisions to NATO’s deterrence posture (including with respect to forward-deployed nuclear weapons), and examines emerging requirements for Allied counter-proliferation planning, “out-of-area” missions (such as Afghanistan ), and civil-military coordination to protect Allied territory and critical infrastructure. Based on these assessments, recommendations are made for U.S. European Command (USEUCOM) planning priorities.

     
    Building Multi-Party Capacity for a WMD-Free Korean Peninsula
    Multilateral Workshop Summary & ProjectReport
    June 2005, 50 pp

     
    Security Policy Reforms in East Asia and a Trilateral Crisis Response Planning Opportunity
    Second interim report, an IFPA Project Interim Paper
    March 2005, 32 pp

     
    The Mexican-U.S. Partnership: Enhancing Our Common Security
    January 2005, 35 pp

     
    The Canada-U.S. Partnership: Enhancing Our Common Security
    January 2005, 35 pp

     
    Trilateral Tools for Managing Complex Contingencies: U.S.-Japan-Korea Cooperation in Disaster Relief & Stabilization/Reconstruction Missions
    January 2005, 5 pp

     
    The Evolution of TCOG as a Diplomatic Tool: First Interim Report
    An IFPA Project Interim Paper
    November 2004, 32 pp

     
    Building Six-Party Capacity for a WMD-Free Korea
    James L. Schoff, Charles M. Perry, and Jacquelyn K. Davis
    January 2004, 112 pp

     
    Defense Reform, Modernization, & Military Cooperation in Southeastern Europe: Vol. 3 of the IFPA-Kokkalis Series on Southeast European Policy
    Edited by Charles M. Perry and Dimitris Keridis
    January 2004, 318 pp

     
    Alliance Diversification & the Future of the U.S.-Korean Security Relationship
    Charles M. Perry, Jecquelyn K. Davis, James L. Schoff, and Toshi Yoshihara
    January 2004, 224 pp

     
    Crisis Management in Japan & the United States: Creating Opportunities for Cooperation amid Dramatic Change
    Edited by James L. Schoff
    January 2004, 156 pp

     
    The U.S.-Japan Alliance: Preparing for Korean Reconciliation & Beyond
    Charles M. Perry and Toshi Yoshihara
    July 2003, 184 pp

     
    Reluctant Allies and Competitive Partners: U.S.-French Relations at the Breaking Point?
    Jacquelyn K. Davis
    July 2003, 242 pp

     
    WMD Challenges on the Korean Peninsula and New Approaches: A Trilateral Dialogue Report
    Summary report on a U.S.-ROK-Japan workshop
    July 2003

     
    The Strategic and Operational Implications of NATO Enlargement in the Baltic Region
    July 2002
    Northeast Asian Security after Korean Reconciliation or Reunification: Preparing the U.S.-Japan Alliance
    February 2002

     
    Greek-Turkish Relations in the Era of Globalization
    Edited by Dimitris Keridis and Dimitrios Triantaphyllou
    November 2001
    Strategic Dynamics in the Nordic/Baltic Region: Implications for U.S. Policy
    Charles M. Perry, Michael J. Sweeney, and Andrew C. Winner
    June 2000, 205 pp

     
    NATO and Southeastern Europe: Security Issues for the Early 21st Century
    Edited by Robert L. Pfaltzgraff, Jr., and Dimitris Keridis
    June 2000, 248 pp

     
    European Security Institutions: Ready for the 21st Century?
    IFPA-Fletcher School Project Team
    January 2000, 248 pp

     
    Strategic Paradigms 2025
    Jacquelyn K. Davis and Michael J. Sweeney
    June 1999, 353 pp

     
    The Way Ahead for Transatlantic Cooperation: Exploiting Collective Advantages
    January 1999, 33 pp
    Security in Southeastern Europe and the U.S.-Greek Relationship
    Edited by Robert L. Pfaltzgraff, Jr., and Dimitris Keridis
    June 1997, 208 pp

     
    Allied-Central European Workshop on Post-Cold War Concepts of Deterrence
    Workshop report
    January 1996, 22 pp
    Allied Planning for Peacekeeping and Conflict Management: Tailoring Military Means to Political Ends
    Report from the Eighth International Roundtable Conference on NATO,
    June 1994, 100 pp

     
    Pacific Partners: Canada and the United States
    Charles F. Doran, Michael K. Hawes, Brian L. Job, Rank Langdon, and Douglas Ross
    January 1994, 129 pp

     
    The Korean-U.S. Relationship in an Era of Change: Summary of a Transpacific Dialogue
    Workshop report
    July 1993, 38 pp

     
    Transatlantic Relations in the 1990s: The Emergence of New Security Architectures
    Hans van de Broek, Pierre-Etienne Champenois, Willem van Eekelen, André Erdös, Lynn Hansen, Gebhardt von Moltke, Jerzy Nowak, Janusz Onyszkiewicz, Robert L. Pfaltzgraff, Jr., and Rob de Wijk
    June 1993, 92 pp

     
    Preventing Instability in Post-Cold War Europe: The Institutional Responses of NATO, the WEU, the EC, the CSCE, and the UN
    Report from the Seventh International Roundtable Conference on NATO
    July 1992, 58 pp

     
    Security Dynamics on the Korean Peninsula: Implications for Regional Stability and Defense Planning
    Workshop report
    June 1992

     
    Change in Europe and the Emergence of New Strategic Priorities: Restructuring Security Arrangements for the 1990s
    Report from the Sixth International Roundtable Conference on NATO,
    December 1991, 45 pp

     
    Japan and the United States: Troubled Partners in a Changing World
    Mike Mochizuki, James E. Auer, Noboru Yamaguchi, Tsuyoshi Hasegawa, Reizo Utagawa, John Curtis Perry, and Jacquelyn K. Davis
    January 1991, 144 pp

     
  • Events

    Rowing Together: Developing Parallel Paths to Stability, Denuclearization and a Peace Regime on the Korean Peninsula
    May 9 – May 10, 2012, Beijing

    The first of two workshops held as part of the Rowing Together: Developing Parallel Paths to Stability, Denuclearization, and a Peace Regime on the Korean Peninsula project. The event was jointly organized by IFPA, the Beijing-based China Institute of International Studies (CIIS), and the Seoul-based Institute of Foreign Affairs and National Security (IFANS) and included leading experts from China, South Korea, and the United States.

     
    U.S.-Japan Peacebuilding Cooperation: Roles and Recommendations
    March 31 – April 1, 2012, Osaka School of International Public Policy, Osaka, Japan

    This workshop, organized by IFPA and the Osaka School of International Public Policy (OSIPP), was part of IFPA's ongoing Peacebuilding as a U.S.-Japan Alliance Mission project.

     
    Counter-Piracy and Counter-Terrorism Planning for Somalia and the Horn of Africa: Implications for NATO and NSHQ Planning
    January 10, 2012, The Hague, the Netherlands

    IFPA collaborated with the Hague Centre for Strategic Studies to organize the seventh NATO SOF Coordination Centre (NSCC) Senior Steering Group (SSG) meeting, a workshop on Somalia and future requirements for counter-piracy and counter-terrorism planning. The workshop explored options for dealing with piracy and its potential use by al-Shabab to destabilize Somalia and its regional partners, and to understand more precisely the possibilities for and/or constraints on an expanded use of NATO, the European Union (EU), or national forces to support the African Union mission in Somalia (AUMIS), to shore up the position of the Transnational Federal Government (TFG) in and possibly beyond Mogadishu, and to empower regional forces in their fight against violent extremists on the African continent. A related workshop objective was to explore the possibilities for enhancing and broadening intelligence collaboration on counter-piracy and counter-terrorism planning between NATO and the EU, and how such collaboration could enable NATO SOF to position themselves more effectively should the Alliance’s political leaders decide to support a more forward-leaning position on Somalia and the Horn of Africa, either to facilitate World Food Program deliveries or to employ the use of force, under a new UNSC mandate, to target jihadi training camps, pirate bases, or other related logistical infrastructure on the ground in Somalia. 

     
    NATO Special Operations Headquarters Senior Steering Group Meeting
    May 24 – May 26, 2011, Krakow, Poland

    The fifth SSG meeting took place in Krakow, Poland, on May 24–26, 2011, in conjunction with the NATO SOF Commanders' Conference and the dedication of the new Polish SOF Headquarters. The NATO SOF Commanders' Conference featured a panel presentation by four SSG members, focusing on lessons-learned from Afghanistan and recent operations. The four SSG members who participated on this panel — Dr. Jacquelyn K. Davis, Dr. Rob de Wijk, Commodore Lars Wille-Jorgensen, and Dr. Andrzej Karkoszka — || had each traveled to Afghanistan with members of the NSHQ and met with ISAF and national SOF teams to hear their perspectives on lessons-learned and the way ahead for NATO SOF planning, training and education, and capabilities development. This meeting also featured the participation of senior Polish defense officials and leaders from U.S. Special Operations Command (SOCOM), including Admiral Eric Olson.

     
    Peacebuilding as a U.S.-Japan Alliance Mission: Developing a Complementary “Whole-of-Alliance” Approach
    April 29, 2011, Washington, D.C., Center for Global Partnership (CGP), Partner Institution: Osaka University, Osaka School of International Public Policy (OSIPP)

    The purpose of this event was to convene a group of experts and practitioners to discuss ways to enhance cooperation between the United States and Japan in international peacebuilding operations. The workshop discussions were led by seven core research members representing U.S., Japanese, and UN perspectives on peacebuilding approaches, using Afghanistan and Sudan as case studies. Other participants were drawn from the government and NGO sectors and contributed to an open exchange of ideas about how Japan and the United States can best cooperate and work synergistically in a “whole-of-alliance” approach to peacebuilding operations in vulnerable or failing states.

     
    U.S.-Russian Relations Beyond New START: What’s Next, What’s Possible, and What’s Necessary
    March 7, 2011, Washington, D.C., an IFPA-DTRA-EUCOM workshop
    Risk Reduction & Confidence Building on the Korean Peninsula: Challenges, Opportunities & Implications for Regional Stability
    January 19, 2011, Seoul, Republic of Korea

    A one-day trilateral dialogue organized by IFPA, the Institute for Foreign Affairs and National Security (IFANS), and the U.S. Institute of Peace (USIP) and supported by the Carnegie Corporation of New York and the U.S. Defense Threat Reduction Agency.

     
    NATO Special Operations Headquarters Senior Steering Group Meeting
    November 21 – November 24, 2010, Mons, Belgium

    This meeting was held in Mons, Belgium, on November 21-23, 2010, in conjunction with the NSHQ's formal activation ceremony and a NATO SOF commanders' conference. At this meeting, Dr. Jamie Shea, then of the Secretary General's Private Office, reported on the results of NATO's Lisbon Summit and highlighted the creation of a new NATO directorate focused on emerging security challenges (where he will now work as its Deputy Assistant Secretary General). The SSG also considered ways to boost support for SOF forces, planning, and capabilities in national capitals and discussed new mission areas, emanating from NATO's New Strategic Concept, for NATO SOF.

     
    NATO SOF Headquarters Senior Advisory Group Meeting
    March 10 – March 11, 2010, Brussels and Mons, Belgium

    SAG members discussed models for the creation of a NATO SOF aviation element and considered new mission areas for which NATO SOF capabilities might be tasked.

     
    NATO SOF Coordination Centre Senior Advisory Group Meeting
    September 9 – September 11, 2009, Rome, Italy

    The second meeting of the NATO SOF Coordination Centre (NSCC) Senior Advisory Group (SAG). held in conjunction with a larger NATO SOF Symposium entitled "NATO Special Operations Forces (SOF) – Key to Mission Success at the Strategic Level." At this second meeting, SSG members discussed implications of the new NATO Strategic Concept for SOF employment and mission planning, as well as opportunities for enhanced intelligence sharing and the operational development of Alliance SOF.

     
    NATO SOF Coordination Centre Senior Advisory Group Meeting
    June 17, 2009, Brussels and Mons, Belgium

    The first meeting of the NATO SOF Coordination Centre (NSCC) Senior Advisory Group (SAG). SAG members were introduced to the NSCC, given briefings about its capabilities, personnel, mission-taskings, and its role in operational planning for Afghanistan.

     
    A New NATO, Euro-Atlantic Security, and the Greek-American Partnership
    April 28 – April 29, 2009, Washington, D.C.

     
    Peace Regime Building on the Korean Peninsula
    November 22, 2008, Washington, D.C.

    A bilateral workshop to help develop an allied consensus with regard to peace regime development on the Korean Peninsula and for broader U.S.-ROK policy coordination vis-á-vis North Korea.

     
    In Times of Crisis: U.S.-Japan Civil-Military Coordination for Disaster Relief Missions
    October 28, 2008, Tokyo, Japan

    Participants reviewed recent civil-military coordination in each country and at the United Nations, discussed the likely future course of these trends, evaluated efforts to date regarding the strengthening of allied cooperation, and discussed possible improvements.

     
    In Times of Crisis: Global and Local Civil-Military Disaster Relief Coordination in the United States and Japan
    December 12, 2006, Washington, D.C.

     
    SHAPE Seminar on Weapons of Mass Destruction: Risks and Challenges to Alliance Security
    March 9, 2006, Brussels, Belgium, in support of General James L. Jones, the supreme Allied commander, Europe (SACEUR)
    Building Multi-party Capacity for a WMD-free Korean Peninsula
    February 17, 2006, Honolulu, Hawaii

    Government officials and foreign-policy experts from the United States, China, Russia, Japan, South Korea, and Australia gathered for a one-day workshop to discuss the six-party talks and to explore options for building regional capacity to implement a denuclearization agreement with North Korea, if and when one is concluded.

     
    Mexican-U.S. Partnership: Enhancing Our Common Security
    December 2, 2005, Washington, D.C.

     
    Trilateral Tools for Managing Complex Contingencies: U.S.-Japan-Korea Cooperation in Disaster Relief & Stabilization/ Reconstruction Missions
    November 2, 2005, Washington, D.C.

     
    Canada - U.S. Partnership: Enhancing Our Common Security
    March 14, 2005, Washington, D.C.

     
    Roundtable Dialogue with Allied Command Transformation
    March 9, 2005, Washington D.C., Headquarters, Supreme Allied Commander Transformation (SACT). Preliminary to wider U.S.-NATO meeting in 2005–06.
    Increasing the Effectiveness of US Security Cooperation Efforts in the Caucasus
    July 22, 2004, Washington, D.C., in support of U.S. European Command
    The Changing Face of Deterrence for NATO: New Concepts, Capabilities, and Challenges
    March 4, 2004, Washington, D.C., in support of U.S. Strategic Command, U.S. European Command, and the Defense Threat Reduction Agency.
    Future of the Korean Peninsula and Japan - U.S. - Korea Security Cooperation
    February 20, 2004, Honolulu, Hawaii, part of the Building Six-Party Capacity project
    WMD Challenges on the Korean Peninsula and New Approaches: A U.S. - ROK - Japanese Dialogue
    April 11, 2003, Seoul, South Korea, part of the Building Six-Party Capacity project

     
    Stability, Deterrence, and the Future of the U.S.-ROK Alliance: Current Pressures and Emerging Priorities
    January 29, 2003, Washington, D.C., in support of U.S. Pacific Command, U.S. Forces Korea, and the Defense Threat Reduction Agency
    The 33rd IFPA-Fletcher Conference on National Security Strategy and Policy
    October 16 – October 17, 2002, Washington, D.C.

     
    Missile Defense and Counterproliferation on the Korean Peninsula: Exploring U.S. - ROK Options and Requirements
    October 8, 2002, Seoul, South Korea

     
    The WMD Challenge on the Korean Peninsula: Exploring a Joint U.S. - ROK Alliance Response
    April 26, 2002, Washington, D.C., part of the Building Six-Party Capacity project

     
    Enhancing Japanese - U.S. Cooperation on Crisis and Consequence Management: Issues Raised by a Large-scale Earthquake in Tokyo and the Exploitation of the Event by Unknown Assailants
    April 10 – April 11, 2002, Tokyo, Japan

     
    Preparing the U.S. - Japan Alliance for a New Security Environment
    April 8 – April 9, 2002, Washington D.C.
    The Strategic and Operational Implications of NATO Enlargement for the Southern Region
    March 16 – March 19, 2002, Naples, Italy, in support of Allied Forces Southern Region
  • Articles & Presentations

    New Strategic Dynamics in the Arctic Region: Implications for National Security and International Collaboration, article drawn from material in full-length study
    Charles M. Perry and Bobby Andersen
    Atlantisch perspectief [Atlantic Perspective] October 2012

    NATO after 9/11: A US Perspective
    By Jacquelyn K. Davis, September 2011

    Consensus Building and Peace Regime Building on the Korean Peninsula
    Charles M. Perry and James L. Schoff
    International Journal of Korean Unification Studies 19, no. 1 (June 30, 2010)

    Achieving Strategic and Economic Balance in the Japan-US-China Triangle
    James L. Schoff and Jun Kurihara
    Cambridge Gazette: Politico-Economic Commentaries, no. 4, March 29, 2010

    For Whom Japan's Last Dance Is Saved — China, the United States, or Chimerica?
    Lecture by James L. Schoff
    Canon Institute for Global Studies (CIGS), Tokyo, Japan, March 29, 2010

    The Road to Better US-North Korea Relations Starts in Seoul
    James L. Schoff

    PacNet, no. 8, February 22, 2010

    Broaching Peace Regime Concepts to Support North Korean Denuclearization
    James L. Schoff

    Produced as part of the Nautilus Institute study, Improving Regional Security and Denuclearizing the Korean Peninsula: U.S. Policy Interests and Options, 2009

    U.S. Extended Deterrence Commitments in East Asia and U.S. Nuclear Posture
    Speech by James L. Schoff
    Center for Strategic and International Studies in Washington, D.C., June 3, 2009
    U.S.-Japan Alliance and the Future of Extended Deterrence
    Speech by James L. Schoff
    Stanford University Shorenstein Asia-Pacific Research Center, May 11, 2009
    An Alliance in Need of Attention
    Op-ed by Richard J. Samuels and James L. Schoff

    International Herald Tribune, January 22, 2009

    U.S. National Defense Strategy & Security of Japan: U.S. Military Transformation and Beyond
    Speech by James L. Schoff, October 29, 2008, Tokyo, Japan

    The Need for Trilateral Cooperation
    By James L. Schoff
    Far Eastern Economic Review, July 2008
    Collaboration with NATO on Missile Defense
    Speech by Robert L. Pfaltzgraff, Jr.,

    Conference on Missile Defence after the Bucharest NATO Summit: European and American Perspectives, Prague, the Czech Republic, May 5, 2008

    Future Prospects for U.S.-Japan-ROK Coordination
    Speech by James L. Schoff
    Pacific Forum CSIS conference, Changing Notions of National Identity and Implications for U.S.-Japan-ROK Relations, in Honolulu, Hawaii, May 5, 2008.
    Hedging and the U.S.-Japan Alliance
    Speech by James L. Schoff
    U.S.-Japan Strategic Dialogue, hosted by MIT at the Endicott House, Dedham, Massachusetts, February 20, 2008.
    Transformation of the U.S.-Japan Alliance
    James L. Schoff
    The Fletcher Forum of World Affairs 31, no. 1(Winter 2007)

    Japan-North Korea Relations from an American Perspective
    Speech by James L. Schoff

    16th Diplomatic Roundtable, December 14, 2005, sponsored by the Japan Forum on International Relations (JFIR) / the Global Forum of Japan / the Council on East Asian Community (in Tokyo)

    The Current State of U.S.-Japan Strategic Dialogue: A Strategic Pause, or an Opportunity Slipping Away?
    James L. Schoff

    Sekai Shuho, October 25, 2005