Asia-Pacific

Following are all current, recent, and past IFPA projects, publications, conferences, workshops, articles, and presentations on issues concerning the Asia-Pacific region.

research
publications
events
articles &
presentations
  • Research

    Rowing Together: Developing Parallel Paths to Stability, Denuclearization and a Peace Regime on the Korean Peninsula

    With generous support from the Carnegie Corporation of New York, IFPA has launched this new project that focuses primary attention on the U.S.-ROK-China triangle as the key dynamic in helping to shape a peaceful and denuclearized Korean Peninsula.

     
    After Hatoyama: Preparing for Japanese Foreign Policy in Transition

    This project studies the challenges that the recently elected Japanese government faces as it tries to develop viable alternatives to the bilateralism on which its foreign policy has been predicated for over fifty years.

     
    Peacebuilding as a U.S.-Japan Alliance Mission

    Working together with partners from Osaka University’s School of International Public Policy (OSIPP) and others, IFPA has undertaken this project to examine U.S.-Japan peacebuilding collaboration and how it could strengthen the alliance in the long run.

     
    Peace Regime Building for a Nuclear Weapon-free Korean Peninsula: Next Steps for Capacity Building

    In cooperation with institutional partners in Northeast Asia, IFPA is leading a nongovernmental multinational working group to discuss, research, and draft a joint proposal for a Korean peace regime that complements related inter-Korean efforts and facilitates North Korean denuclearization.

     
    The U.S.-Japan Alliance and the Future of Extended Deterrence

    In the new setting since North Korea’s nuclear test, this project, completed in 2009, undertakes a fresh assessment of thinking in Japan and the United States about extended deterrence in Northeast Asia.

     
    Support to the Defense Department, Combatant Commands, and Military Service Leadership

    This is an ongoing project for the Department of Defense (DoD), for which the Institute provides detailed policy reports and organizes high-level workshops on critical issues of national security for DoD, combatant command (COCOM), and military service leaderships.

     
    In Times of Crisis: Global and Local Civil-Military Disaster Relief Coordination in the United States and Japan

    With support from the Japan Foundation's Center for Global Partnership (CGP), IFPA led this collaborative effort, completed in 2009, by U.S. and Japanese specialists to conduct research and foster dialogue among civilian and military groups for the purposes of improving their civil-military communication in domestic and international crises.

     
    Building Six-Party Capacity for a WMD-Free Korea

    This three-year study completed in 2008 involves all of the countries in the six-party process and examines how these countries can build a regional organization to help implement the key aspects of a denuclearization agreement reached with North Korea.

     
    Identifying Trends in Japan-DPRK Relations and Implications for U.S. Policy

    This project, funded by the Smith-Richardson Foundation and completed in 2006, examined the determining factors behind Japan's evolving North Korea policy and how they will affect America's strategic and tactical approaches to the DPRK.

     
    Building on the Trilateral Coordination and Oversight Group (TCOG): Exploring the Prospects for Expanding the TCOG Process as a Key U.S.-South Korea and U.S.-Japan Alliance Management Tool

    This two-year project was completed in 2005. With a grant from the Japan Foundation’s Center for Global Partnership (CGP) IFPA collaborated with leading policy research institutions in Japan and South Korea on a policy research project to strengthen the U.S.-Japan and U.S.-South Korea relationships and enhance regional stability by improving the tools for alliance management.

     
    Stability and Confidence Building on the Korean Peninsula: Meshing Korean Reconciliation with U.S. Security Requirements

    This study, funded by the Smith Richardson Foundation and completed in 2004, made a unique contribution both to the broad policy debate on the U.S. response to Korean reconciliation and to the articulation of a restructured military posture better suited to the geopolitical conditions of a reconciled (if not reunified) Korea. The study concluded with a monograph, Alliance Diversification and the Future of the U.S.-Korean Security Relationship, by Charles M. Perry, Jacquelyn K. Davis, James L. Schoff, and Toshi Yoshihara.

     
    Northeast Asia After Korean Unification: Preparing the Japan-U.S. Alliance

    This joint three-year study completed in 2003 by IFPA and the Japan Institute of International Affairs (JIIA) examined the long-term implications of Korean unification for the U.S.-Japan alliance. The study concluded with a monograph, The U.S.-Japan Alliance: Preparing for Korean Reconciliation & Beyond, by Charles M. Perry and Toshi Yoshihara.

     
    Enhancing Joint Crisis Management Capabilities: Issues and Policy Options for Japan-U.S. Cooperation

    In this joint two-year study completed in 2002, IFPA and the Osaka School of International Public Policy (OSIPP) examined issues and policy options on joint crisis management between Japan and the United States, exploring how Tokyo and Washington might better prepare for and respond to an array of crisis scenarios ranging from traditional security threats to emerging challenges.

  • Publications

    Rowing Together: Developing Parallel Paths to Stability, Denuclearization and a Peace Regime on the Korean Peninsula
    Weston Konishi
    December 2013, 128 pp

    Many consider U.S.-China-Republic of Korea trilateral cooperation to be a key dynamic in achieving a denuclearized North Korea and a more lasting peace structure on the Korean Peninsula. Yet dialogue among these three actors is relatively unheard of, and Beijing, Seoul, and Washington continue to diverge on many critical aspects of managing the ongoing nuclear crisis with North Korea. Rather than “rowing together” on many critical areas of peninsular security, the United States, China, and the ROK have often been “rowing apart.” With generous support from the Carnegie Corporation of New York, the Institute for Foreign Policy Analysis (IFPA) launched a major project in 2011 aimed at enhancing U.S.-China-ROK dialogue on this critical issue and encouraging all three sides to “row together.” Leading experts and officials from all three countries convened over the course of two workshop sessions in Beijing and Jeju Island to explore new avenues for trilateral cooperation on the Korean Peninsula. IFPA commissioned six conference papers, each representing the views of the participating countries, from select workshop participants. The conference papers are collected here, in this compendium report, providing policy makers and researchers with an invaluable collection of analysis as well as realistic recommendations for improving trilateral cooperation toward containing and reducing (if not eliminating) North Korea’s nuclear programs and strengthening the prospects for stability and security on and around the Korean Peninsula.

     
    U.S.-Japan Peacebuilding Cooperation: Recommendations toward a Whole-of-Alliance Approach
    Co-edited by Weston S. Konishi and Hoshino Toshiya
    October 2012, 172 pp

    U.S.-Japan Peacebuilding Cooperation: Roles and Recommendations toward a Whole-of-Alliance Approach is a compendium of workshop papers written by U.S., Japanese, and other experts and provides a comprehensive examination of how bilateral peacebuilding cooperation can be enhanced, both in the context of bilateral whole-of-alliance cooperation and as an effective mechanism for international peacebuilding operations. With case studies of peacebuilding operations in Sudan and Afghanistan, this report seeks to illuminate the obstacles and opportunities of U.S.-Japan peacebuilding cooperation in real-world scenarios. A list of policy recommendations at the end of the report provides further points of consideration for both policy makers and students of U.S.-Japan alliance relations and international peacebuilding alike.

     
    From Rhetoric to Reality: Foreign-Policy Making under the Democratic Party of Japan
    Weston S. Konishi
    April 2012, 112 pp

    This report examines the Democratic Party of Japan (DPJ)’s foreign-policy making since it took power in 2009. Prepared as part of a project supported by the Smith Richardson Foundation, the report looks at the key people, policies, and processes that have come to underlie the DPJ’s foreign-policy making as a ruling party, and it includes an attempt to define and categorize four main foreign policy strains within the party. Rather than focus on the current state of U.S.-Japan relations, this study examines Japan’s broader diplomatic and strategic activity beyond the bilateral relationship while considering how these actions might impact the U.S.-Japan relationship in the future.

     
    Denuclearizing North Korea: Exploring Multilateral Approaches to Risk Reduction and Peace Regime Building
    Weston S. Konishi
    September 2011, 71 pp

    The final project report from a nongovernmental (Track 2) multinational working group led by IFPA to address security issues on the Korean peninsula.

     
    The U.S. Approach to Peacebuilding: From a Whole-of-Government to a Whole-of-Alliance Approach with Japan
    Weston S. Konishi and Charles T. McClean
    June 2011, 14 pp

    This paper was first presented at a one-day bilateral workshop on April 29, 2011, held in conjunction with the Osaka School of International Public Policy (OSIPP) in Washington, D.C. In the papers, authors aim to assess each government's “whole-of-government” or interagency coordination of peacebuilding policies and to identify priorities, assets, and expertise as applied to Afghanistan and Sudan. The goal of the project is to explore the strengths and weaknesses of both the United States and Japan’s respective initiatives with an eye toward how the two allies can best cooperate and work synergistically in a “whole of alliance” approach to peacebuilding operations in vulnerable or failing states.

     
    Peacebuilding as a U.S.-Japan Alliance Mission: Developing a Complementary “Whole-of-Alliance” Approach
    Weston S. Konishi
    May 2011, 8 pp

    Summary of an April 29, 2011, workshop held in conjunction with the Osaka School of International Public Policy (OSIPP), Washington, D.C.

     
    Risk Reduction & Confidence Building on the Korean Peninsula: Challenges, Opportunities & Implications for Regional Stability
    Workshop report by Charles M. Perry, Jacquelyn K. Davis, and Weston S. Konishi
    May 2011, 21 pp

    Report on a January 19, 2011, workshop that brought together approximately fifty prominent policymakers and experts from the United States, the People’s Republic of China, and the Republic of Korea for in-depth discussions focusing on the current security situation on and surrounding the Korean Peninsula and prospects for greater cooperation among the three nations represented at the workshop.

     
    In Times of Crisis: U.S.-Japan Civil-Military Disaster Relief Coordination
    James L. Schoff and Marina Travayiakis
    May 2009, 144 pp

    The many large-scale natural disasters and ambitious nation-building projects over the last several years call attention to the potential value of deploying national military assets in support of disaster relief and recovery efforts, as well as to the challenges that disaster relief agencies and nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) face when working closely with the military. Both U.S. and Japanese policy makers understand that leveraging military resources during a disaster is an opportunity to save lives and property, to help maintain stability and prosperity in affected nations, and to promote the allies' diplomatic interests, but it must be done carefully. Together with a handful of other key countries, the United States and Japan can help form a valuable crisis core group that cooperates in support of large-scale, UN-led disaster relief operations, but effective civil-military coordination is essential to making this work. The In Times of Crisis project was a multi-year joint effort of the Institute for Foreign Policy Analysis (IFPA) and the Osaka School of International Public Policy (OSIPP), involving practitioners and policy makers from both countries, the United Nations, and NGOs through interviews and bilateral workshops. This monograph explains the team's findings and ways to improve the allies' ability to effectively pool civilian and military resources and to respond together (bilaterally or as part of a broader coalition) in support of host nations and international relief agencies to speed recovery in times of crisis.

     
    Peace Regime Building for a Nuclear Weapon-free Korean Peninsula: What Next?
    James L. Schoff and Yaron Eisenberg
    May 2009

    North Korea's recent nuclear test is only the latest in a series of moves by Pyongyang that seem directed at "shaping a new diplomatic framework" for the Korean Peninsula, rejecting the Six-Party process and returning to its traditional insistence on bilateral talks with the United States to end the Korean War. These developments illustrate the strong linkages between North Korean denuclearization and peace regime building on the Korean Peninsula (i.e., trying to institute a political solution to the Korean War beyond just a military armistice). Working with partners in South Korea, the United States, and China, IFPA is in the middle of a three-year project exploring peace regime building on the Korean Peninsula in ways that support and facilitate the denuclearization objectives of the Six-Party Talks; this interim report describes the results of over a year's worth of interviews, research, and a U.S.-South Korea bilateral workshop, up to and including North Korea's May 2009 nuclear test.

     
    Realigning Priorities: The U.S.-Japan Alliance and the Future of Extended Deterrence
    James L. Schoff
    May 2009

    North Korea's missile/rocket launch over Japan and maritime skirmishes in the South China Sea between the United States and China place new burdens on the U.S.-Japan security relationship. For more than two generations the United States has provided a security guarantee to Japan that is backed by the U.S. nuclear capability. The future of this extended deterrence relationship is the focus of this report. It addresses evolving discussion about deterrence in Japan as well as the United States and examines the conditions under which Japan might consider new approaches to assuring its future security.

     
    The Six-Party Talks and New Opportunities to Strengthen Regional Nonproliferation and Disarmament Efforts
    Matthew Martin
    March 2009

    Report of an October 2008 conference sponsored by the Stanley Foundation, the National Committee on North Korea, the Institute for Foreign Policy Analysis, and the Chinese Arms Control and Disarmament Association.

     
    Nuclear Matters in North Korea: Building a Multilateral Response for Future Stability in Northeast Asia
    James L. Schoff, Charles M. Perry, and Jacquelyn K. Davis
    July 2008, 186 pp

    This 2008 monograph presents the findings of a three-year multilateral research project that explores ways to bridge differences among the parties and to develop a common approach to North Korean nuclearization. It explores the strengths and weaknesses of the six-party process and offers practical solutions to the numerous implementation challenges regarding nuclear dismantlement and verification, and coordinated economic assistance and investment.

     
    The Pandemic Influenza Challenge: Multilateral Perspectives on Preparedness, Response Planning, and Areas for Cooperation
    January 2007, 64 pp

    This 2007 report, based in part on the results of a 2006 IFPA-led multilateral workshop held in Tokyo, Japan, reviews current international efforts to mitigate the potentially devastating effect of a pandemic influenza, particularly in the Asia-Pacific region. It also examines the national and military planning efforts of the United States, Japan, and the Republic of Korea in addressing this emerging crisis, and it explores options for improved multilateral cooperation in disaster response planning.

     
    Building Multi-party Capacity for a WMD-free Korean Peninsula
    August 2006, 49 pp

    Report of a workshop held on February 17, 2006,in Honolulu, Hawaii. Government officials and foreign-policy experts from the United States, China, Russia, Japan, South Korea, and Australia gathered for a one-day workshop to discuss the six-party talks and to explore options for building regional capacity to implement a denuclearization agreement with North Korea, if and when one is concluded.

     
    Political Fences & Bad Neighbors: North Korea Policy Making in Japan and Implications for the United States
    James L. Schoff
    January 2006, 40 pp

    Policy coordination with Japan regarding North Korea is always important for U.S. policy makers, given the persistent security challenges posed by the DPRK and the lack of progress on North Korean denuclearization. The situation is further complicated by the oftentimes conflicting interests of other key regional players (such as China and South Korea) regarding priorities and policy approaches vis-à-vis the North. This report explores how Japan's policy toward North Korea has evolved over time, and it describes how domestic politics and bureaucratic organization affect current Japanese policy making in this area. U.S.-Japan policy coordination toward North Korea is discussed, and the implications of all of these factors are examined with policy recommendations to strengthen alliance cooperation.

     
    Building Multi-Party Capacity for a WMD-Free Korean Peninsula
    Multilateral Workshop Summary & ProjectReport
    June 2005, 50 pp

     
    Security Policy Reforms in East Asia and a Trilateral Crisis Response Planning Opportunity
    Second interim report, an IFPA Project Interim Paper
    March 2005, 32 pp

     
    Tools for Trilateralism: Improving U.S.-Japan-Korea Cooperation to Manage Complex Contingencies
    James L. Schoff
    January 2005, 122 pp

    One of the more successful innovations in the area of U.S.-Japan and U.S.-South Korea alliance management was the establishment of the Trilateral Coordination and Oversight Group (TCOG) for developing common policies toward North Korea. The three countries can learn from the TCOG and use other diplomatic and military planning tools to improve the way that they prepare for and respond to complex contingencies, such as a large-scale natural disaster, a regional or global epidemic, or the adverse affects of a failing nation-state. This monograph evaluates these tools and identifies ways that they can be better integrated to strengthen the alliance relationships and to enhance regional capacity in the areas of crisis and consequence management. The book includes the first comprehensive study of the TCOG from the perspective of the three nations’ participants, as well as a detailed analysis of how they contributed to the unprecedented multilateral response to the 2004 South Asian tsunami disaster.

     
    Trilateral Tools for Managing Complex Contingencies: U.S.-Japan-Korea Cooperation in Disaster Relief & Stabilization/Reconstruction Missions
    January 2005, 5 pp

     
    The Evolution of TCOG as a Diplomatic Tool: First Interim Report
    An IFPA Project Interim Paper
    November 2004, 32 pp

     
    Coordinating Regional Strategies for a WMD-Free Korea: A Multilateral Dialogue Report
    Guillermo Pinczuk and James Schoff
    May 2004, 32 pp

     
    Building Six-Party Capacity for a WMD-Free Korea
    James L. Schoff, Charles M. Perry, and Jacquelyn K. Davis
    January 2004, 112 pp

     
    Alliance Diversification & the Future of the U.S.-Korean Security Relationship
    Charles M. Perry, Jecquelyn K. Davis, James L. Schoff, and Toshi Yoshihara
    January 2004, 224 pp

     
    Crisis Management in Japan & the United States: Creating Opportunities for Cooperation amid Dramatic Change
    Edited by James L. Schoff
    January 2004, 156 pp

     
    The U.S.-Japan Alliance: Preparing for Korean Reconciliation & Beyond
    Charles M. Perry and Toshi Yoshihara
    July 2003, 184 pp

     
    WMD Challenges on the Korean Peninsula and New Approaches: A Trilateral Dialogue Report
    Summary report on a U.S.-ROK-Japan workshop
    July 2003

     
    Missile Defense and Counterproliferation on the Korean Peninsula: Exploring U.S.-ROK Requirements and Options
    January 2003, 34 pp

     
    Northeast Asian Security after Korean Reconciliation or Reunification: Preparing the U.S.-Japan Alliance
    February 2002

     
    Taiwan in a Transformed World
    Edited by David Tawei Lee and Robert L. Pfaltzgraff, Jr
    January 1995, 140 pp

     
    Taiwan in a Changing Global Setting
    Workshop report
    July 1994, 75 pp

     
    The Korean-U.S. Relationship in an Era of Change: Summary of a Transpacific Dialogue
    Workshop report
    July 1993, 38 pp

     
    Security Dynamics on the Korean Peninsula: Implications for Regional Stability and Defense Planning
    Workshop report
    June 1992

     
    Naval Arms Control and Pacific Security in the 1990s
    Workshop report
    January 1992, 25 pp

     
    Japan and the United States: Troubled Partners in a Changing World
    Mike Mochizuki, James E. Auer, Noboru Yamaguchi, Tsuyoshi Hasegawa, Reizo Utagawa, John Curtis Perry, and Jacquelyn K. Davis
    January 1991, 144 pp

     
  • Events

    Rowing Together: Developing Parallel Paths to Stability, Denuclearization and a Peace Regime on the Korean Peninsula
    May 9 – May 10, 2012, Beijing

    The first of two workshops held as part of the Rowing Together: Developing Parallel Paths to Stability, Denuclearization, and a Peace Regime on the Korean Peninsula project. The event was jointly organized by IFPA, the Beijing-based China Institute of International Studies (CIIS), and the Seoul-based Institute of Foreign Affairs and National Security (IFANS) and included leading experts from China, South Korea, and the United States.

     
    U.S.-Japan Peacebuilding Cooperation: Roles and Recommendations
    March 31 – April 1, 2012, Osaka School of International Public Policy, Osaka, Japan

    This workshop, organized by IFPA and the Osaka School of International Public Policy (OSIPP), was part of IFPA's ongoing Peacebuilding as a U.S.-Japan Alliance Mission project.

     
    Peacebuilding as a U.S.-Japan Alliance Mission: Developing a Complementary “Whole-of-Alliance” Approach
    April 29, 2011, Washington, D.C., Center for Global Partnership (CGP), Partner Institution: Osaka University, Osaka School of International Public Policy (OSIPP)

    The purpose of this event was to convene a group of experts and practitioners to discuss ways to enhance cooperation between the United States and Japan in international peacebuilding operations. The workshop discussions were led by seven core research members representing U.S., Japanese, and UN perspectives on peacebuilding approaches, using Afghanistan and Sudan as case studies. Other participants were drawn from the government and NGO sectors and contributed to an open exchange of ideas about how Japan and the United States can best cooperate and work synergistically in a “whole-of-alliance” approach to peacebuilding operations in vulnerable or failing states.

     
    Risk Reduction & Confidence Building on the Korean Peninsula: Challenges, Opportunities & Implications for Regional Stability
    January 19, 2011, Seoul, Republic of Korea

    A one-day trilateral dialogue organized by IFPA, the Institute for Foreign Affairs and National Security (IFANS), and the U.S. Institute of Peace (USIP) and supported by the Carnegie Corporation of New York and the U.S. Defense Threat Reduction Agency.

     
    Peace Regime Building on the Korean Peninsula
    November 22, 2008, Washington, D.C.

    A bilateral workshop to help develop an allied consensus with regard to peace regime development on the Korean Peninsula and for broader U.S.-ROK policy coordination vis-á-vis North Korea.

     
    In Times of Crisis: U.S.-Japan Civil-Military Coordination for Disaster Relief Missions
    October 28, 2008, Tokyo, Japan

    Participants reviewed recent civil-military coordination in each country and at the United Nations, discussed the likely future course of these trends, evaluated efforts to date regarding the strengthening of allied cooperation, and discussed possible improvements.

     
    The Six-Party Talks and Opportunities to Strengthen Regional Nonproliferation and Disarmament
    October 23 – October 24, 2008, Beijing, China

    A multilateral dialogue looking beyond the immediate challenges associated with North Korean denuclearization to begin to chart a course for managing that country’s re-entry into the NPT in ways that strengthen regional and global nonproliferation and disarmament norms.

     
    Building Multi-party Capacity for a WMD-free Korean Peninsula
    April 27, 2007, Beijing, China

     
    Pandemic Influenza Workshop: Multilateral Perspectives on Preparedness, Response Planning, and Areas for Cooperation
    September 27, 2006, Tokyo, Japan, in support of U.S. Pacific Command

    Military officers, government representatives, and foreign policy experts from the United States, Japan, and the Republic of Korea gathered for a one-day workshop to discuss the potential threat of a pandemic influenza in the Asia-Pacific region. The event was co-sponsored by the Institute for Foreign Policy Analysis, the Institute of World Studies at Takushoku University, and the United States Pacific Command (PACOM).

     
    Building Multi-party Capacity for a WMD-free Korean Peninsula
    February 17, 2006, Honolulu, Hawaii

    Government officials and foreign-policy experts from the United States, China, Russia, Japan, South Korea, and Australia gathered for a one-day workshop to discuss the six-party talks and to explore options for building regional capacity to implement a denuclearization agreement with North Korea, if and when one is concluded.

     
    Trilateral Tools for Managing Complex Contingencies: U.S.-Japan-Korea Cooperation in Disaster Relief & Stabilization/ Reconstruction Missions
    November 2, 2005, Washington, D.C.

     
    Building Multi-Party Capacity for a WMD-Free Korean Peninsula
    March 16 – March 17, 2005, Shanghai, part of the Building Six-Party Capacity project

     
    Future of the Korean Peninsula and Japan - U.S. - Korea Security Cooperation
    February 20, 2004, Honolulu, Hawaii, part of the Building Six-Party Capacity project
    WMD Challenges on the Korean Peninsula and New Approaches: A U.S. - ROK - Japanese Dialogue
    April 11, 2003, Seoul, South Korea, part of the Building Six-Party Capacity project

     
    Stability, Deterrence, and the Future of the U.S.-ROK Alliance: Current Pressures and Emerging Priorities
    January 29, 2003, Washington, D.C., in support of U.S. Pacific Command, U.S. Forces Korea, and the Defense Threat Reduction Agency
    Taiwan Security and Air Power
    January 9, 2003, Washington D.C.

    As part of its research and dialogue efforts focused on Asia-Pacific security, IFPA co-sponsored this senior-level conference in Taipei, Republic of China (ROC). The conference was organized in cooperation with the Center for Taiwan Defense and Strategic Studies, the Graduate Institute of International Affairs and Strategic Studies oat Tam Kang University, and the ROC's National Defense University, all in Taipei, and with the Centre for Defence and International Security Studies of Lancaster University in the United Kingdom. The conference provided an opportunity for in-depth discussion of the potential role of airpower in undergirding the defense of Taiwan, with discussion focusing on the cross-strait balance of power as a whole and with respect to air power assets in particular, air power modernization efforts now underway in both the ROC and the People's Republic of China (PRC), the role of air and missile defense systems in ensuring ROC security, and emerging priorities for the ROC Air Force in the years ahead.
    Both before and after the conference, IFPA and other U.S. speakers and commentators were able to meet and exchange views with a very senior group of ROC officials, including President Chen Shui-bian, Defense Minister Tang Yiau-ming, Legislative Yuan Vice President Chiang Pin-Kung, Deputy Foreign Minister Kau Ying-mao, National Security Bureau Director Tsai Chao-Ming, National Security Council Secretary General Chou I-Jen, and Secretary General Chan Chun-Hsiung of the ruling Democratic Progressive Party.

    Missile Defense and Counterproliferation on the Korean Peninsula: Exploring U.S. - ROK Options and Requirements
    October 8, 2002, Seoul, South Korea

     
    The WMD Challenge on the Korean Peninsula: Exploring a Joint U.S. - ROK Alliance Response
    April 26, 2002, Washington, D.C., part of the Building Six-Party Capacity project

     
    Enhancing Japanese - U.S. Cooperation on Crisis and Consequence Management: Issues Raised by a Large-scale Earthquake in Tokyo and the Exploitation of the Event by Unknown Assailants
    April 10 – April 11, 2002, Tokyo, Japan

     
    Preparing the U.S. - Japan Alliance for a New Security Environment
    April 8 – April 9, 2002, Washington D.C.
  • Articles & Presentations

    Consensus Building and Peace Regime Building on the Korean Peninsula
    Charles M. Perry and James L. Schoff
    International Journal of Korean Unification Studies 19, no. 1 (June 30, 2010)

    Achieving Strategic and Economic Balance in the Japan-US-China Triangle
    James L. Schoff and Jun Kurihara
    Cambridge Gazette: Politico-Economic Commentaries, no. 4, March 29, 2010

    For Whom Japan's Last Dance Is Saved — China, the United States, or Chimerica?
    Lecture by James L. Schoff
    Canon Institute for Global Studies (CIGS), Tokyo, Japan, March 29, 2010

    The Road to Better US-North Korea Relations Starts in Seoul
    James L. Schoff

    PacNet, no. 8, February 22, 2010

    Broaching Peace Regime Concepts to Support North Korean Denuclearization
    James L. Schoff

    Produced as part of the Nautilus Institute study, Improving Regional Security and Denuclearizing the Korean Peninsula: U.S. Policy Interests and Options, 2009

    U.S. Extended Deterrence Commitments in East Asia and U.S. Nuclear Posture
    Speech by James L. Schoff
    Center for Strategic and International Studies in Washington, D.C., June 3, 2009
    U.S.-Japan Alliance and the Future of Extended Deterrence
    Speech by James L. Schoff
    Stanford University Shorenstein Asia-Pacific Research Center, May 11, 2009
    China-U.S. Strategic Stability
    Speech by Robert L. Pfaltzgraff, Jr.

    Prepared for Nuclear Order — Build or Break, Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, Washington, D.C., April 6, 2009

    Does the Nonproliferation Tail Wag the Deterrence Dog?
    James L. Schoff
    PacNet, no. 9, February 5, 2009

    An Alliance in Need of Attention
    Op-ed by Richard J. Samuels and James L. Schoff

    International Herald Tribune, January 22, 2009

    North Korea Goes Nuclear, Again
    James L. Schoff
    Far Eastern Economic Review, September 2008
    Setting a "Good Example" in Beijing
    James L. Schoff
    Far Eastern Economic Review, August 2008
    First Things First in the Six-Party Talks: Verify and Implement
    Op-ed on North Korean denuclearization by James L. Schoff
    PacNet #37, July 9, 2008

    The Need for Trilateral Cooperation
    By James L. Schoff
    Far Eastern Economic Review, July 2008
    Nuclear Matters in North Korea: U.S. Strategy and the Six-Party Talks
    Speech by James L. Schoff
    Indianapolis World Affairs Council, Indianapolis, Indiana, May 20, 2008.
    Future Prospects for U.S.-Japan-ROK Coordination
    Speech by James L. Schoff
    Pacific Forum CSIS conference, Changing Notions of National Identity and Implications for U.S.-Japan-ROK Relations, in Honolulu, Hawaii, May 5, 2008.
    Reform Locally, Act Globally? Crisis Management Trends in Korea
    James L. Schoff and Choi Hyun-jin
    KEI's Academic Paper Series, April 2008

    Is the Party Over?
    James L. Schoff
    Far Eastern Economic Review, April 2008
    Thinking Globally in Seoul
    James L. Schoff
    Far Eastern Economic Review, March 2008
    A Return to 'Checkbook Diplomacy'?
    James L. Schoff
    Far Eastern Economic Review, February 2008
    Hedging and the U.S.-Japan Alliance
    Speech by James L. Schoff
    U.S.-Japan Strategic Dialogue, hosted by MIT at the Endicott House, Dedham, Massachusetts, February 20, 2008.
    How to Keep the Six-Party Talks from Failing
    By James L. Schoff
    Far Eastern Economic Review, January 2008
    Enabling Disablement: Some Assembly Required
    Op-ed by James L. Schoff
    PacNet #40a, October 9, 2007

    Make the Working Groups Work
    James L. Schoff

    PacNet, no. 10, February 27, 2007

    Transformation of the U.S.-Japan Alliance
    James L. Schoff
    The Fletcher Forum of World Affairs 31, no. 1(Winter 2007)

    Abduction Diplomacy and the Six-Party Talks
    James L. Schoff
    Pacific Forum CSIS, April 25, 2006

    Japan-North Korea Relations from an American Perspective
    Speech by James L. Schoff

    16th Diplomatic Roundtable, December 14, 2005, sponsored by the Japan Forum on International Relations (JFIR) / the Global Forum of Japan / the Council on East Asian Community (in Tokyo)

    The Current State of U.S.-Japan Strategic Dialogue: A Strategic Pause, or an Opportunity Slipping Away?
    James L. Schoff

    Sekai Shuho, October 25, 2005

    The 108th Congress: Asia Pacific Policy Outlook
    James L. Schoff
    National Bureau of Asian Research Briefing Paper, no. 11, January 2003